My Magee Campaigns

Nicole Meloche Memorial Breast Cancer Fund

Metastatic breast cancer claims over 40,000 lives every year. Magee-Womens, in partnership with the Pittsburgh Penguin Alumni Association want to change that.

The Pittsburgh Penguin Alumni have created the Nicole Meloche Memorial Breast Cancer Fund in memory of one of their own, Nicole Meloche. She holds a special place in the hearts of the alumni and through their efforts they are funding a research project that will better understand the why and how of metastatic breast cancer.

Stanley-Cup-1991-edited

Nicole Meloche was just 39 years old when she was diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer in 1990. At the time, she and her husband, Gilles Meloche, former Pittsburgh Penguin, and coach and then amateur scout for the Pens, lived in Montreal with their two young children, Eric and Annie. Nicole bravely fought her breast cancer and amazed her doctors when she went into remission. She was a champion.

To those around her, she was the model of courage, perseverance and determination. Unfortunately, the cancer metastasized and on November 18, 1993, Nicole lost her gallant fight.

She didn’t get to see her son grow up and play for the Pittsburgh Penguins, just like his father. She didn’t get to see her daughter mature into a beautiful¬†woman, wife and mother. Nicole didn’t get to see her four grandchildren and see Gilles celebrate 30 years with the Pittsburgh Penguins as a player, coach and scout.

The Nicole Meloche Memorial Breast Cancer Fund will support metastatic breast cancer research at Magee-Womens Research Institute.

Josie Scarpaci Breast Health Access Fund

For the past several years, Joe Scarpaci, Jr. has “Biked for Breast Cancer” in memory of his mother, Josie. Josie, once a prominent real estate agent in Mount Lebanon, PA, lost her battle to breast cancer in 1998.

The Josie Scarpaci Breast Health Access Fund was created to help provide educational resources for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. So far, more than $57,500 has been raised in Josie’s name to allow Magee to provide a comprehensive resource binder to newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. The binders include information about treatment options, procedures, and medical terms and provide space for the patient to take notes about her treatment and keep track of important details to improve her outcome and provide the support each patient needs to regain her health.

Noah Angelici Hope Foundation

Noah and his twin brother Jackson developed a rare disorder before birth, Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome (TTTS), resulting in several blood vessels connecting the twins. This condition required a unique and lifesaving fetal surgery performed by only a few surgeons worldwide. After birth, Noah bravely fought for two and a half years before it eventually claimed his life in December 2007.

The Noah Angelici Hope Foundation aims to support research toward the diagnosis, treatment, and education of Twin-to-Twin Transfusion syndrome and to provide support and hope to families and babies affected by this rare condition. Each year, the foundation hosts two events–Follow the Star Gala and the Noah Angelici Hope Foundation Memorial Golf Outing.

The Twenty-Five Club

Since its inception in 1939, the Twenty-Five Club has supported newborn medicine, neonatal research, and fetal interventions at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC and the Magee-Womens Research Institute. The membership is limited to 25 active members, but the Society also includes 12 associate members, and seven lifetime members. Their fundraising efforts support The Twenty-Five Club Chair in Neonatology Research. Through fundraising activities and events such as the Fall Luncheon, the Christmas Ball, the Cradle Will Rock event (benefitting pre-natal and neonatal research and clinical care at Magee), and an annual patron letter, the generous support of the Twenty-Five Club has led to breakthroughs that have impacted the health of babies locally and world-wide. Thanks to their contributions, they have:

Provided comfort items for babies born with an inherited addiction to drugs

Supported crucial research projects in the field of newborn medicine

Provided important resources for over 1,700 babies who stay in Magee’s NICU each year

Helped position Magee as one of 12 hospitals in the country to offer fetal intervention, including in-utero surgery for Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome and spina bifida

Created the Twenty-Five Club Endowed Chair in Newborn Medicine.

In 2014, the Twenty-Five Club celebrated its 75th anniversary.

Meet the Twenty-Five Club

Since its inception in 1939, the Twenty-Five Club has supported newborn medicine, neonatal research, and fetal interventions at Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC and the Magee-Womens Research Institute. The membership is limited to 25 active members, but the Society also includes 12 associate members, and seven lifetime members. Their fundraising efforts support The Twenty-Five Club Chair in Neonatology Research. Through fundraising activities and events such as the Fall Luncheon, the Christmas Ball, the Cradle Will Rock event (benefitting pre-natal and neonatal research and clinical care at Magee), and an annual patron letter, the generous support of the Twenty-Five Club has led to breakthroughs that have impacted the health of babies locally and world-wide. Thanks to their contributions, they have:

Bobbi Aiello

Debbie Barbarita

Jeanne Caliguiri

Rona Dane

Susan Fitzsimmons

Michel Franklin

Dani Grego

Veronica Guarino

Janice Hackett

Kathleen Hess

Heather Hillier

Penny Holden

Shanon Mahramas

Carol Massaro

Dani Jo McClane

Barbara Norris

Kathe Patrinos

Faye Sampson

Marsetta Schweiger

Doris Shepherd

Peggy Snavely

Arlene Sokolow

Judy Woffington

Susan Zitelli

In 2014, the Twenty-Five Club celebrated its 75th anniversary.

Women’s Auxiliary

Interested in meeting the changing needs within Magee, the Women’s Auxiliary participates in projects that raise funds for programs that advance patient care and comfort recommended by the hospital administration.

The Auxiliary sponsors the Baby Picture Program and the Kodak Picture Maker, which is a kiosk where families can upload pictures from their cameras. Another project of the Auxiliary, the Clothes Line, offers gently worn women’s clothing, jewelry, household items, books, and more at their resale shop located at 4804 Liberty Avenue in Bloomfield.

The members fund programs and projects that are most compatible with the Auxiliary’s ideals and goals. The group has contributed to major hospital initiatives such as the expansion of Magee-Womens Research Institute, the renovation of the neonatal intensive care unit, and funded equipment upgrades in the Scott L. Williams, MD Breast Care Center.

Recognizing the Auxiliary’s ongoing commitment and remarkable energy, dedication, and success in fundraising for Magee, the group received the Elisabeth B. McCullough Award in 2006 in recognition of the long-standing Clothes Line project.

Learn more about the Clothes Line